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IT Technology

Difference Between Cache and Register

Cache vs Register

Summary: Difference Between Cache and Register is that Memory cache helps speed the processes of the computer because it stores frequently used instructions and data. While registers are also a part of a computer processor and holding one small piece of data in Processor. A register may hold a piece of data, like a storage address and computer instruction.

Difference Between Cache and Register

Cache

Most of today’s computers improve processing times with cache (pronounced cash). Two types of cache are memory cache and disk cache. Memory cache helps speed the processes of the computer because it stores frequently used instructions and data. Most personal computers today have at least two types of memory cache: L1 cache and L2 cache.

L1 Cache

L1 cache is built directly in the processor chip. L1 cache usually has a very small capacity, ranging from 8 KB to 128 KB.

L2 Cache

L2 cache is slightly slower than L1 cache but has a much larger capacity, ranging from 64 KB to 16 MB. Current processors include advanced transfer cache, a type of L2 cache built directly on the processor chip. Proces sors that use advanced transfer cache perform at much faster rates than those that do not use it. Personal computers today typically have from 512 KB to 12 MB of advanced transfer cache.

Cache speeds up processing time because it stores frequently used instructions and data. When the processor needs an instruction or data, it searches memory in this order: L1 cache, then L2 cache, then RAM — with a greater delay in processing for each level of memory it must search. If the instruction or data is not found in memory, then it must search a slower speed storage medium such as a hard disk or optical disc.

Register

Registers are also a part of a computer processor and holding one small piece of data in Processor. A register may hold a piece of data, like a storage address and computer instruction. Some instructions specify registers as part of the instruction. E.g it may be specified that an instruction of two registers can be placed together on a specified register. There must be a large register enough so that it can hold instructions. For example, in a 32-Bit instruction computer, a register must be 32 bits in length. But in many computers, there are smaller registers like half registers for shorter instructions. Registers may have arbitrary or numbers names which depends on the processor designs and language rules.

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